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Tree Planting w/ Land Based & Conservation 23/01/2020

STUDENTS HEAD TO TRENCH WOOD

Our Land-Based and Conservation students braved the chilly, but sunny weather to get stuck in at Trench Wood.

HUGE VARIETY

Did you know that there is a vast variety of trees and insects in our local woodland? If you’re ever out and about, take a look and see how many you can spot.

ABOUT TRENCH WOOD

Trench Wood is a local nature reserve maintained by Worcestershire Wildlife Trust and The Butterfly Conservation.

Historically the woodland was managed by coppicing – chopping down trees almost to the ground to encourage regeneration.  When done on a cycle this ensures a constant variety of habitats for wildlife.  In the 1960s the wood was owned by Harris Brush Company to provide wood for their brush handles.  They allowed some native trees to grow but also planted non-native trees in the woodland.  We’ve been gradually clearing the latter and encouraging the growth of native trees and shrubs. Current management of the wood helps to ensure a matrix of habitats that can support migrant warblers and butterflies.

PROMOTING DIVERSITY

This particular part of the woodland is low on diversity, so our Land-Based and Conservation students set about clearing three glades. Clearing trees assists in promoting diversity and, at the same time, creates a food source for foraging animals such as birds or insects.

For example, small-leaved lime is brilliant for insects in early spring as its flowers provide an amazing source of food as we come out winter. Cherry and Rowen trees Rowan produce fruit which all manner of animals and insects can eat and oaks provide acorns for squirrels.

Planting saplings close together will also create a really dense structure so will be the perfect habitat for nesting birds and small mammals to find places to hide from predators

THE IMPORTANCE OF DIVERSITY IN WOODLAND

Diversity is a main component of a healthy urban forest. Different species are susceptible to different pests and different kinds of damage, so the more different kinds of trees are planted in a community, the less vulnerable the overall community forest will be to invasive species, climate change, or severe weather.

LAND BASED & CONSERVATION STUDIES

Our Land based and Conservation students have been learning about the importance of biodiversity within our local woodland. Managing the growth and environment of habitats is a key focus of our unique environmentally focused qualification, without this knowledge or skills our important landscapes would look very different. Our Land based students are always out and about, check out some of their previous articles:-

OUR COURSES

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